Records of Fortune

Yeah, Classics!

humanoidhistory:

GREETINGS FROM POMPEII — Vintage visions of the ancient ruins of Pompeii, Italy, circa 1905, photochrome color postcards from the Detroit Publishing Company, courtesy of the Library of Congress.

(via mythologer)

fer1972:

Today’s Classic: Sisyphus Punishment

1. By Titian (1549)

2. By Alexandre Denis Abel de Pujol (1819)

3. By Franz von Stuck (1920)

4. Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones (1870)

5. By Antonio Zanchi (1665)

(via mythologer)

ancientart:

Marbury Hall Zeus. Roman, 1st century, marble.

Portrayed as a mature bearded man, Zeus sits enthroned in his role as king of the gods. Originally he would have held his attributes: a scepter and a thunderbolt. The colossal god towers over his mortal observers.
This Roman statue dates to the first century A.D., but certain stylistic features in the carving, especially in the face and hair, reveal that it reproduces an earlier, Hellenistic Greek statue. Its model was a statue made by a school of sculptors based in the city of Pergamon in the 100s B.C.
Documented in the 1570s at Tivoli near Rome, the statue once decorated the gardens of the Villa d’Este. It is named for having once been in the collection at Marbury Hall in England. (getty)

Currently located at The J. Paul Getty Museum, Villa Collection, Malibu, California, via their online collections, 73.AA.32.  Digital image courtesy of the Getty’s Open Content Program.

ancientart:

Marbury Hall Zeus. Roman, 1st century, marble.

Portrayed as a mature bearded man, Zeus sits enthroned in his role as king of the gods. Originally he would have held his attributes: a scepter and a thunderbolt. The colossal god towers over his mortal observers.

This Roman statue dates to the first century A.D., but certain stylistic features in the carving, especially in the face and hair, reveal that it reproduces an earlier, Hellenistic Greek statue. Its model was a statue made by a school of sculptors based in the city of Pergamon in the 100s B.C.

Documented in the 1570s at Tivoli near Rome, the statue once decorated the gardens of the Villa d’Este. It is named for having once been in the collection at Marbury Hall in England. (getty)

Currently located at The J. Paul Getty Museum, Villa Collection, Malibu, California, via their online collections73.AA.32 Digital image courtesy of the Getty’s Open Content Program.

(via c-aesarion)

omgthatartifact:

Tooth Pendants
Etruscan, 4th century BC
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

omgthatartifact:

Tooth Pendants

Etruscan, 4th century BC

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

And why get angry at Helen?
As if she singlehandedly destroyed those
multitudes of men.
As if she all alone
made this wound in us.

—Klytaimestra in Aiskhylos’s Agamemnon, translated by Anne Carson (via elucipher)

(Source: patricknathan, via renaissancemadonna)

silvabism:

Apollo and Daphne Jakob Auer (ca. 1645 - 1706) Vienna, before 1688 Ivory In his Metamorphoses, Ovid tells of the nymph Daphne, who eluded the desires of the sun god Apollo by turning herself into a laurel tree (Greek daphne, laurel).The two-figure group depicts the beginning of this transformation. In travel reports from the Baroque period, this virtuoso piece of carving was already considered a major work of the Viennese imperial treasury.

silvabism:

Apollo and Daphne
Jakob Auer (ca. 1645 - 1706)
Vienna, before 1688
Ivory

In his Metamorphoses, Ovid tells of the nymph Daphne, who eluded the desires of the sun god Apollo by turning herself into a laurel tree (Greek daphne, laurel).
The two-figure group depicts the beginning of this transformation. In travel reports from the Baroque period, this virtuoso piece of carving was already considered a major work of the Viennese imperial treasury.

(via thatdear)

classic-art:

Creusa Preventing Aeneas from Fighting Again During the Destruction of Troy
Joseph Benoit Suvée, c. 1784

classic-art:

Creusa Preventing Aeneas from Fighting Again During the Destruction of Troy

Joseph Benoit Suvée, c. 1784

(via didoofcarthage)