Records of Fortune

Yeah, Classics!

suammetuit:

mythology alphabet: t - tartarus [(Greek: Τάρταρος)], in ancient Greek mythology, is the deep abyss that is used as a dungeon of torment and suffering for the wicked and as the prison for the Titans. As far below Hades as the earth is below the heavens, Tartarus is the place where souls were judged after death and where the wicked received punishment.

(via grumpybilbo)

Canterbury dig uncovers Britain's oldest road

archaeologicalnews:

Hundreds of people in Canterbury took to the city’s Westgate Parks, to take part in an archaeological dig that uncovered Roman artefacts, treasures, and Britain’s oldest road.

Over six hundred people stopped by the community dig over the three-day weekend, to see some of the amazing finds…

ancientromebuildings:

24th August 79 - Vesuvius erupts and buries Pompeii and Herculaneum
Via Stabbiana, Pompeii
source: By Jensens (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

ancientromebuildings:

24th August 79 - Vesuvius erupts and buries Pompeii and Herculaneum

Via Stabbiana, Pompeii

source: By Jensens (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

greek-museums:

Archaeological Museum of Brauron:

Artemis protector of children:

Maiden goddess Artemis protected newborn children and young women during labour, the most important moment of their life- childbirth mortality rates were pretty high for both infants and mothers. According to a version of the myth, when Artemis was young she assisted her mother Leto as she leaned on the trunk of a palm-tree to deliver her twin brother Apollo.

The numerous statuettes of girls and boys that were found in the sanctuary- dating at the 2nd half of the 4th century B.C- indicate that at this time Artemis mainly appears as a goddess of labour and child protector. That is why she is called Locheia and quite often she is also identified as Eileithya- goddess of confinement.

Parents dedicated statuettes of young children probably as thank-offerings either for a successful childbirth or children’s recovery from an illness. The aim of this dedication was to set the children under the constant supervision and protection of the goddess. Apart from their garments, women dedicated also the garments of their children to Artemis as well.

Besides a religious centre, the sanctuary functioned as a place of education as well. The children that served the goddess were trained to contribute to the well-being of society as active citizens.

The children here wear their everyday clothes- a chitor or a himation- and they hold in their hands an animal- rabbit or puppy-, a bird, or an object- possibly one of their favourite toys.

ancientpeoples:

Marble head of a young woman 
Head is from a funerary stela. It is 40.6cm high (16 inch.) 
Greek, Classical period, 4th century BC. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Marble head of a young woman 

Head is from a funerary stela. It is 40.6cm high (16 inch.) 

Greek, Classical period, 4th century BC. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

minoancorner:

esperanzapinatelli:

triglifos-y-metopas:

Saffron Gatherer, fresco.
Erroneously re-assembled as a man by Sir Arthur Evans. It turn out, on further examination to be a blue monkey in a field of crocuses).
Palace of Knossos.
Crete, Greece.
1550-1450 B.C. (Late Minoan)

large size HERE, via Met, more on this era HERE


Modern day reconsrtuction of the fresco. (x)

minoancorner:

esperanzapinatelli:

triglifos-y-metopas:

Saffron Gatherer, fresco.

Erroneously re-assembled as a man by Sir Arthur Evans. It turn out, on further examination to be a blue monkey in a field of crocuses).

Palace of Knossos.

Crete, Greece.

1550-1450 B.C. (Late Minoan)

large size HERE, via Met, more on this era HERE

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u188/Chesterthegreat12/Fig7.jpg

Modern day reconsrtuction of the fresco. (x)

(via classicsenthusiast)

greek-museums:

Archaeological Site of Sounio/ Sanctuary of Poseidon:

This partridge is not the only one who took a stroll on history. Inscribed on the soft poros stones are the names of thousands of visitors of the 19th century. Plenty philhellenes sought to make it to history on the resilient immortality of these ancient stones. The Greek admirers of antiquity followed suit.

  • the oresteia: well that aeschylated quickly